Creative Reuse: From Midtown to the classroom

Bergdorf Goodman is taking the creative reuse route

Readers of our blog have seen how one teacher from Staten Island used zippers, donated to MFTA from Marc Jacobs, to create an art-integrated science lesson for her classes. Followers of our Twitter feed can also see these zippers on our profile page. It looks like the window designers at Bergdorf Goodman are taking a cue from us and incorporating zippers into their work (above). Farther down Fifth Avenue, creative reuse abounds at MFTA recipient, Museum of Modern Art.

Have you gotten the American Eagle costume jewelery from MFTA? Why don't you put it in a clear egg? This egg is "Compact Object" (1962) by Natsuyuki Nakanishi. Bones, watch and clock parts, bead necklace, hair, eggshell, lens, and other manufactured objects embedded in polyester. Museum of Modern Art, New York

Watches, clock parts, bead necklaces–we’re practically swimming in these items thanks to American Eagle. We don’t have any bones, but you could make some out of materials from the warehouse, like this science teacher did. Here’s a creative reuse for your scrap paper via Venezuelan artist Alejandro Otero: Cut it into strips and make a Mondrian-inspired collage.

Detail from "Ortogonal (Collage)" by Alejandro Otero. Cut-and-pasted colored paper on paper mounted on paper. Museum of Modern Art, New York

Jasper Johns is a master at reinterpreting objects “the mind already knows.” His Flag (1954-55) is a highlight of the MoMA collection and demands to be seen in person. While it might look like something you’re familiar with, a close examination reveals…something else you’re familiar with.

You can see the newsprint peeking through in this detail from "Flag" (1954-55) by Jasper Johns. Encaustic, oil, and collage on fabric mounted on plywood, three panels. Museum of Modern Art, New York

Teachers: You can tap into ideas like these to engage your students in our P credit course, “Paper: From Pulp to Fiction.”  During this course you will focus on integrating art-making and teaching the Common Core standards, while learning techniques for paper making, pen and ink, block prints, stenciling, silkscreen and collage. Our teaching artists will work with you to integrate these engaging projects into whatever subject you teach. Best of all, you can do it all with free materials from the MFTA warehouse. In the collage project below, students created collage puppets of mythic characters, then had to write stories explaining their origins.

Collage puppets, made from free materials from MFTA, are a great way to engage your students in ELA

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2 Responses to Creative Reuse: From Midtown to the classroom

  1. Pingback: Creative Reuse: From Midtown to the classroom « spare parts

  2. Pingback: Creative Reuse: From Midtown to the classroom : spare parts

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