Creative Infusion: Linking art and science

"Skeleton, Anterior View," (1795 to 1806) for "A Comparative Anatomical Exposition of the Structure of the Human Body with that of a Tiger and a Common Fowl" by George Stubbs. Graphite on cream wove paper. Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection, New Haven, CT

My science teachers were good, but I always felt their lessons veered into “the memorization of specialized terminology and technical details.” This is exactly what the New York State Science Standards, the Elementary Science Core Curriculum, cautions against:

Children’s natural curiosity leads them to explore the
natural world. They should be provided opportunities to
have direct experience with common objects, materials,
and living things in their environments. Less important is
the memorization of specialized terminology and technical details.

Thankfully, NYC public school teachers can count on Materials for the Arts to provide free materials to enrich their lessons. A group of DOE teachers is thinking of novel ways to incorporate our materials into their lessons during the P credit course, Creative Infusion. One participant in the course, a science teacher, had a great way to integrate Styrofoam (which tends to be free for anyone looking), elastic rope, some shark teeth and plastic film canisters (all from the MFTA warehouse). Check out what she made after the jump.

A science teacher manipulating the articulating vertebrae she created during Creative Infusion

She used these materials to create versions of the vertebral column (Let me admit, I’ m veering into Wikipedia entries now–unfortunately I can’t learn the facts by attending the lesson) .

Three teaching tools give students a visual and tactile feel for this science lesson

This teacher is using more than backbones to catch her students’ attention. In this video she’s modeling the “thinking cap” that encourages her students to observe and interpret their surroundings. The thinking cap is definitely different garb than I remember my teachers wearing and it is sure to stick in the minds of her students.

Are you a DOE teacher? You can develop great ideas for integrating MFTA materials into your classroom while earning P credits toward your 30-Plus during our upcoming P credit course, “Paper: From Pulp to Fiction

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4 Responses to Creative Infusion: Linking art and science

  1. Pingback: Creative Infusion: Linking art and science « spare parts

  2. Pingback: Creative Reuse: From Midtown East to the classroom | Materials for the Arts

  3. Pingback: Creative Reuse: From Midtown to the classroom | Materials for the Arts

  4. Pingback: Creative Infusion: Linking art and science : spare parts

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