Creative Reuse: On skates and in the classroom

"Maximum Sensation" (2010) by Mounir Fatmi. Fifty skateboards covered with collaged Islamic prayer rugs. Brooklyn Museum

I just noticed this newly installed work in the Brooklyn Museum‘s contemporary galleries (on the museum’s fourth floor). The work, “Maximum Sensation,” by Mounir Fatmi is an installation of 50 skateboards covered with collaged Islamic prayer rugs. Any visitor to the warehouse knows we have a ton of carpet samples–while these are decidedly not Islamic prayer rugs–we’ve been coming up with a ton of artistic project ideas for re-using them.

Carpet samples in the MFTA warehouse

Teachers can use these carpet samples to create a life-sized Scrabble or Bananagrams game or to make tiles for a number line.

Carpet re-used in the classroom

The carpet samples also make for a great pair of slippers.

Carpet samples from MFTA are transformed into slippers (Image: Barbara Korein)

Use the carpet samples to make a colorful rack for magazines or workbooks in the classroom

TEACHERS: Learn to integrate art-making and whatever subject you teach during MFTA’s P credit course “Creative Infusion: The Art of Reuse.” Participants in this course  focus on using free or low-cost materials in art projects that link to the Common Core Standards. This course offers a great chance to workshop project ideas in a supportive studio setting of fellow educators and MFTA’s teaching artists.

Here’s a great example of a project that could be linked to any number of classroom subjects–I’m thinking a math teacher would have a field day incorporating lessons on measurement, scale and angles. Students would have a field day making the bags and would pick up all sorts of math and real-world skills along the way!

How about a purse? (Image: Jim Ditto)

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2 Responses to Creative Reuse: On skates and in the classroom

  1. Pingback: Volunteer Spotlight: Columbia Urban Experience | Materials for the Arts

  2. Pingback: Donor Spotlight: Aronson’s Floor Covering | Materials for the Arts

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